Macau Pork Chop Bun – Tai Lei Loi Kei @ Hutong Lot 10

A favorite of both locals & tourists, Lot 10 Hutong has successfully bought together some of the best, most famous local food together in a single destination of comfort and convenience.
Just yesterday Tan Sri Francis Yeoh announced the launch of the Hutong brand in Guangzhou, China, a globalization move that every one of us as Malaysian should be proud of.
Now Malaysian food (really authentic ones) will be available in Zhujiang (in Guangzhou), in the Fuli Yingxin Building starting August 2013.

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Spanning 2 levels, the Tsai Lan (Chua Lam) City of Fusion Foods wil feature a vast array of premium gourmet delights, dry & wet food personally selected  by Chua Lam from HK and Taiwan.
Hutong will be on Level One, featuring 19 Malaysian heritage brands over 2095 sq metres.

Tan Sri Francis Yeoh said “All these centuries, Malaysia has mostly been importing dried and wet products from China. However, with Hutong in Guangzhou, we are doing the reverse by exporting fresh food of secret heritage recipes, served piping hot to celebrate Nanyang’s best with universal taste appeal t Chinese palates everywhere in the world”.

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Back on Malaysian soil, just yesterday also, Lot 10 Hutong welcomed 2 new exciting brands to its food court.

Tai Lei Loi Kei is Macau’s renowned & iconic Macanese Pork Chop Bun. I have not personally had this before, though I was in Macau many years ago.
For RM11.90, (or RM13.90 for Set A for an added milk tea) the pork chop bun is substantially filling as both the bun and pork chop was pretty big.

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I like the bun; soft insides and nice crusty top, almost like a French baguette though not as chewy. The pork chop itself is said to be the best and most expensive chunky Brazilian pork-chop, measuring 5cm thick and they do not contain much fat and when deep-fried they become super crunchy.
The one I had wasn’t really crunchy but the meat is well marinated though at some parts a tad saltier than the rest. A good thing here is the lean cut used, but it was deep-fried so that kind of nullified any good diet intentions. As for how thick it is, you can see it for yourself here.

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The secret recipe of their homemade marinade sauce has been passed down for 2 generations. One of the ingredients is brandy which is added to the marinade to give the pork chop a rich and mellow taste. Butter is added to enhance the aroma of the buns, along with condiments using Portuguese spices.

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If you opt for the set, a cup of Macau Milk Tea (hot/cold) would complete the meal. 

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A sneak peek at the workers in the “kitchen”.
At one corner dozens of pork meat was being deep-fried while here the workers were seen busy toasting the buns before packing them for a long queue of customers.

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Here’s the menu for your perusal should you decide to give Tai Lei Loi Kei @ Hutong Lot 10 a visit soon.

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And the prices should you decide to go ala-carte.
I won’t mind returning toTai Lei Loi Kei to try the other items on the menu; namely the noodles or curry fish balls but I can’t say that I’m a fan of the pork bun. It’s good, but it won’t induce any cravings. Not for me anyways.

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Tai Lei Loi Kei @ Hutong Lot 10
50 Jalan Sultan Ismail, 50250 Kuala Lumpur.

Category : Food